Tuesday Self Test – GROL

This Tuesday Self Test question is from the Element 1 General Radiotelephone Operator Class question pool:

1-8B1 (C)

What is the best way for a radio operator to minimize or prevent interference to other stations?

A. By using an omni-directional antenna pointed away from other stations.

B. Reducing power to a level that will not affect other on-frequency communications.

C. Determine that a frequency is not in use by monitoring the frequency before transmitting.

D. By changing frequency when notified that a radiocommunication causes interference.

Tuesday Self Test – General

This Tuesday Self Test question is from the Element 3 General Class question pool:

G1E01 (A) [97.115(b)(2)]

Which of the following would disqualify a third party from participating in stating a message over an amateur station?

A. The third party’s amateur license has been revoked and not reinstated

B. The third party is not a U.S. citizen

C. The third party is a licensed amateur

D. The third party is speaking in a language other than English

Are You Ready?

Normally, we think of storms and fire and maybe getting a call to report to the EOC to handle comms – if our homes are safe, of course.

But what about a missing child?

What if you got a call to report at 8pm to EOC to help with an area search? Would you be prepared for that? Team leaders were recently put on standby for that very thing.

The little girl was found not long after, but it did bring up some preparedness questions.

Outside of it being end-of-day, and most of us heading to bed, would you have had to scramble to be there?

Part of managing an emergency is being prepared before it happens.

This doesn’t mean you have to grab your 72-hour bag.It doesn’t even have to be your regular deployment go-bag with all the wires and adapters and nerd stuff.

Participating in this task force would have been good with a HT with charged batteries, appropriate clothing and shoes, nighttime supplies like a sturdy flashlight, light-sticks, and bug repellent. Some water and snacks. A little cash for refueling body and vehicle. A low-load kit like this can be kept in a large fanny pack.

Check your preps. Maintain them year-round, not just storm season. Your participation may very well make the difference.

What’s In Your Bag?

A 72-hour bag is personal. One for a man will be different for a woman. Children’s bags are built around items to keep them occupied. Though most will be similar in load-out, the specific items will vary.

In short, don’t let anyone tell you what you must have. There are as many ways to pack – and overpack – a bag as there are websites to tell you how.

For the new folk, a 72-hour bag is what you will need personally for a couple of days if you have to leave your home. You may be evacuated, or it may be a deployment. You may be called up to work a shelter, or you may get pushed out of your home by a storm. Either way, “home” is what’s in that bag for a day or three.

Assuming you’re not going to have to live off the land you’ll need toiletries, change of clothes (multiple underwear and socks), snacks, water, and medications.

Make sure any meds are in labeled pharmacy bottles. And carry copies of important documents, as long as the originals are in a safe place. Otherwise, bring the originals in plastic zip-bags.

Maybe a pillow and blanket to keep in your car. And a book to keep you occupied during slack time, of which there will be a lot. Don’t count on having a place to recharge your phone, tablet, or computer. One you sap the battery, it might be a while before you can charge it back up.

And remember, pets can not be taken into shelters, but if you evacuate, your pet needs to go with you. Plan ahead, have a carrier and their supplies, too.

Jane Wester, staff writer for the Austin American-Stateman, penned a good piece based on her regions recent flooding. Using the FEMA checklist she did the shopping and comparisons, and offers her thoughts.

Here’s some thoughts to get you started on your 72-hour bag:

FEMA kit checklist
FEMA kit checklist for parents
Ready dot gov
AMR Team Suggested Kit
Texas Prepares website
LDS About 72 Hour Kit

36 Lessons Learned

Country Village wind damage

A large eucalyptus tree blew down during a late afternoon storm on May 29, 2016. This was located just inside the cedar windbreak along Cowboy Way at Country Village. Photo KM4OVX
A large eucalyptus tree blew down during a late afternoon storm on May 29, 2016. This was located just inside the cedar windbreak along Cowboy Way at Country Village. Photo KM4OVX
Country Village tree down
The top portion of a cedar tree from the windbreak was found on the ground after the May 29, 2016 storm. This was located just inside the cedar windbreak along Cowboy Way at Country Village, near the large eucalyptus tree that blew down. Photo KM4OVX